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Parent Power Blog

 

Welcome to the Parent Power Blog!

What to feed a sicky? Our pediatrician recommends the B.R.A.T diet for kids that are sick to their stomachs or having diahrrea: bananas, rice, applesauce and toast.   You need to make sure that the fluids they are able to keep down are as helpful as possible, and electrolytes are very important.  Once they're able to hold food down and are feeling a bit better, there's always the tried and true sicky food: chicken noodle soup.  I recommend you avoid what I consider to be junk they sell in the cans--especially the kind with MSG-- it's easy to make your own.  It's fast, healthier, and tastes yummy, even if you're not sick (we often have it for dinner with fresh baked whole wheat dinner rolls and a salad).  Here's my favorite recipe.

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My daughter is a book worm, and is naturally very sedentary.  My son tends to be more active, but revolts against organized exercise.  He'd rather get it in the course of play.  So when it's time to go for a walk, my son instantly develops extreme ankle and foot pain and my daughter switches into full tween pout and whine mode. 

So what's the deal?  How can I motivate my string-bean-armed son and my floppy daughter to not just do their exercises, but to enjoy them?

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The kids know they have two exits from their rooms: their door and their window.  But the other day, I was washing windows and screens and one of the windows was frozen shut!  On top of that, I realized that screens are often quite difficult to remove--especially for kids.

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Since I've become an adult, imaginative play is difficult for me.  It's a real struggle to sit down with the kids and join them in a game of make believe with dolls or action figures--I can't think of a story line, or if I do, it doesn't interest them.  I feel old and boring.  My husband, on the other hand, is GREAT with thinking of fun imaginative games to play with the kids.

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As our kids have made poor choices over the years, it's been important to me that they recognize the natural consequences of those choices.  Many times, however, the natural consequences aren't instantly apparent or the kids may be so young that they don't recognize them or aren't deterred by them.

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Take the time to watch your kids reading.  Are they squinting at all or moving the book forwards and back to make it easier to focus?  Do they complain of frequent headaches or have have tired, red eyes?  These are all indicators that your child might be having trouble seeing and should have their eyes checked.

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There are so many reasons why children are placed in a Residential Treatment Center. I cannot begin to detail all of them and how they could have been prevented. But here are a few things that might help us all be a little better parents.

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There are lots of things that my husband and I learned from living and working at the Treatment center, but the most import ones are:
1.    Patience
2.    Not to internalize what the residents said or did
3.    Children want and need rules and boundaries
4.    Parenting really matters
5.    Food is a great motivator

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What is it like to be in a treatment center? My experience comes from having been the “house parent” in a RTC “Residential Treatment Center” as well as being a staff member and then becoming the Assistant Director.

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Why are children and youth in the State's custody and when are they placed in Treatment Centers?

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